Category Archives: Gift Ideas

From Tea Time Magazine: Teapots by Amy Cates

This week, we’re sharing a nice article on teapots from Tea Time Magazine.

Teapots by Amy Cates

Teapots by Amy Cates

If you don’t subscribe to Tea Time Magazine, we highly recommend it for interesting articles, delicious recipes, inspiration and lots of extras! You can subscribe, give a gift subscription (a great tea gift that keeps on giving) or receive the Tea Time Newsletter at TeaTimeMagazine.com.

Our Tip: If you can afford a subscription to Tea Time Magazine, it is well worth the money as a resource that you’ll continually reference and share. Otherwise, get the Newsletter and check out the website! They’re free and the website has many wonderful resources like slide shows for making Candied Lemon Zest Curls or Sugared Flowers, printable recipe cards and many downloadable recipes.

For your next tea party visit Teapots ‘n More and browse our newest selection of english bone china tea setsteapots & tea accessories.

Candied Lemon Zest Curls Slideshow, Tea Time Magazine

Sugared Flowers Slideshow, Tea Time Magazine

Advertisements

Pecan Praline Cookies with Brown Sugar Frosting from My Own Sweet Thyme

An awesome holiday cookie recipe…or an all year indulgence! Brown sugar, pecan cookie with brown sugar icing…seriously, what’s not to like?

We hope you enjoy it and thank you to My Own Sweet Thyme for posting it. FYI: This blog is worth checking out!

My Own Sweet Thyme: Pecan Praline Cookies with Brown Sugar Frosting: One of the best things about being a home cook is finding others who share that same interest. It is a delight to meet someone whose eyes …

For your next tea party, we invite you to visit Teapots ‘n More and browse our selection of authentic English bone china tea setsteapotstea accessories and antique tea cups.

Bone China Mugs for Tea

Lady Diana Rose Chintz Mug

C.S. Lewis said,

You can’t get a cup of tea big enough or a book long enough to suit me.”

He might have liked a mug!

Check out this video for a preview of lovely Staffordshire bone china mugs available at Teapots ‘n More!

Visit Teapots ‘n More and browse our selection of bone china mugsenglish bone china tea setsteapots & antique chintz tea cups.

Dark Chocolate Ginger Molasses Cookies

A tasty cookie for the Autumn/Winter season and a lovely hostess gift or party favor along with the recipe!

Makes about 5 dozen.

¾ cup softened butter or good margarine such as Imperial
1 cup granulated sugar
¼ cup unsulphured molasses
1 egg
3 cups sifted all-purpose flour
2 tsp. baking soda
1 tsp. ground cinnamon
½ tsp. ground cloves
½ tsp. ground ginger
½ tsp. salt
¼ pound candied ginger slices, finely diced
¼ to ½ pound dark chocolate, 72%
Additional granulated sugar

1. Reserve 2 Tbsp. candied ginger for decoration. In a large bowl, cream together butter and 1 cup sugar with a pastry blender or a mixer at low speed. Add molasses, egg and remaining candied ginger, beating until well blended.

2. In a separate bowl, sift together flour, baking soda, cinnamon, cloves, ginger and salt. Add to butter mixture and mix well. Cover and chill in refrigerator overnight.

3. Form dough into 1 inch balls. Roll each ball in granulated sugar and place on greased cookie sheets 2 inches apart.

4. Bake at 375°F for 6-8 minutes or until golden brown. Let stand 1 minutes and remove cookies to wire rack to cool.

5. Melt chopped chocolate in a double boiler or microwave. Using a fork drizzle melted chocolate over cookies. Before chocolate sets, sprinkle tops with reserved candied ginger.

6. After chocolate is set, place cookies in an airtight container and store in a cool place 1 week or freeze for 1 month.

For your next tea party, we invite you to visit Teapots ‘n More and browse our selection of authentic English bone china tea sets, teapots, tea accessories and antique tea cups.

Grimwade Brothers: Home of Royal Winton Chintz

One of the most successful chintz producing potteries, Grimwade Brothers, began in 1885 at the Winton Pottery, Stock-on-Trent when Leonard Grimwade invited his older brother Sidney to join his manufacture business.  Sidney was a potter, however, it appears that Leonard was the enterprising force behind the prosperity of Grimwade Brothers. He was described by business associates and employees alike as a man of vision, energy and generosity.

His company grew quickly receiving patents for a number of innovative products including the Paragon coffee pot with a removable strainer, a Safety Milk Bowl and a Quick-Cooker Bowl. Earthenware for the kitchen, toiletry, hospital, nursery and table was produced by the company. The chintz ware for which the company is well know may have been produced as early as 1913 in more traditional patterns such as Jacobean ware, Hampton chintz and Spode Chintz. These patterns were large and widely spaced.

Today, we generally associate chintz with smaller closely packed patterns. The first chintz of this nature produced by Grimwades was Paisley in 1923. However, the pottery’s first major success with a “modern” chintz pattern was the design Marguerite in 1928. This pattern is said to have been inspired by a design Mrs. Minnie Grimwade was working on a cushion at the time. The success of Marguerite was followed by numerous new chintz patterns during the next 20+ years. Some patterns remained proprietary to Grimwade such as Julia and Welbeck, while others were sold for use by other potteries such as Rose Du Barry.

Although Leonard Grimwade died unexpectedly in 1931, his company florished for many years. By the 1960s, due to a number of factors, the market for chintz had dropped off. The Grimwade company was sold to Howard Potteries in 1964 with the Royal Winton trade name kept intact. Various company buyouts proceeded over the years with the Royal Winton name still remaining. As far as we know, the latest company to trade as Royal Winton is still producing chintz ware. There are 12 patterns available with some of the most popular original chintz designs reintroduced in the 1990s.

Royal Winton chintz continues to be a favorite with collectors. Listed below are some excellent resources available for those who wish to explore the rich history of Royal Winton and English chintz ware.

This brief summary was gleaned from Collecting Royal Winton Chintz by Muriel M. Miller, Francis Joseph Publications 1996 available on Amazon.

Book Resources:

Collecting Royal Winton Chintz by Muriel M. Miller

Royal Winton Porcelain: Ceramics Fit for a King by Eileen Rose Busby

The Charlton Standard Catalogue of Chintz, 3rd Edition by Susan Scott

Chintz Ceramics by Jo Anne Welsh

For your next tea party visit Teapots ‘n More and browse our newest selection of english bone china tea sets, teapots & antique chintz tea cups.

The Wileman Shelley Pottery: A brief history

Shelley CountrySide Chintz

In a nod to all those wonderful & dedicated Shelley collectors, we’re starting off our history series on English Potteries with the Wileman Shelley works.

The Shelley pottery was prolific in producing a large variety of very fine patterns in fine bone china. As the Shelley Pottery, it operated from 1925 to the late 1960s. However, the pottery got its start under Henry Wileman. Around 1860, he was producing earthenware products at the Foley pottery in Staffordshire, England. He started a second pottery for the production of fine china which became the Shelley pottery.

The Shelley name comes from Joseph Shelley who joined the Wileman family as a salesperson. In 1870, Joseph became a partner with James Wileman, Henry’s son, in Wileman & Company. James ran the original earthenware pottery and Joseph focused on the fine china production. Joseph Shelley worked hard to produced the finest quality china and expand foreign export. His son, Percy, joined the business in 1881.

Example of Shelley Backstamp

Percy Shelley brought in top artists and litho designers thereby improving the appearance of the fine china wares. He was so successful that the reputation and demand for Shelley china grew both at home and abroad. Both Wileman and Shelley wares are still avidly collected today and the value of many patterns remains high.

Wileman Foley Demitasse Empire Shape

Upon the death of his father, Percy took full control of the pottery and ran the company for about 50 years. Around 1910, he became involved in a legal battle over the use of “Foley” in his backstamp which was the name of a pottery region. After losing, he renamed his manufacturing works Shelley around 1925. Thus the Shelley brand was born.

As is true of other major English chintz manufacturers, production and creativity was greatest from the 1920’s through the 1950’s with a brief drop in the years surrounding World War II. In 1966, the company was sold to Allied Potteries.

Wileman Shelley collectors have at least three collector’s clubs accessible online with a wealth of information on history, shapes, patterns and backstamps. For detailed histories & further research, please check out the following club sites as well as the reference books listed below and available on Amazon.

Example of Wileman Foley Backstamp

Online Club Sites:

Australasian Shelley Collector’s Club

The Shelley Group

National Shelley China Club

Book Resources:

Shelley Chintz: Unlocking the Secrets of the Pattern Books by Kelly Moran

Shelley China: Schiffer Book for Collectors by Tina Skinner

Shelley Tea Ware Patterns by Sheryl Burdess

More Shelley China: Schiffer Book for Collectors by Lee Jones & Russ Nicholas

Brown Sugar Shortbread

For your Autumn tea, try this easy & deliciously rich cookie with the taste of buttery caramels. It’s certain to become a year round favorite!

Makes about 3 dozen.

1 cup softened butter (no margarine)
½ cup packed brown sugar
2 ¼ cups flour

1. Preheat oven to 300 degrees F. In a mixing bowl, cream butter and sugar.

2. Gradually stir in flour. Turn onto a lightly floured surface and knead until smooth, about 3 minutes.

3. Pat into a 3/8″ thick rectangle measuring 11″ by 8″ (about the size of a sheet of lined paper).

4. Cut into 2″ by 1″ strips. Place 1″ apart on ungreased baking sheets. Prick with a fork.

5. Bake for 25 minutes or until bottom begins to brown. Remove from oven and cool on baking sheet for 5 minutes then remove to a wire rack to cool completely. Store in an airtight container 1-2 weeks or freeze for 3-4 months.

You’re invited to visit Teapots ‘n More and browse our selection of English bone china tea sets, teapots, tea accessories and antique tea cups.